Running for election to the OpenStack TC!

Last week I submitted my candidacy for election to the OpenStack Technical Committee[1], [2].

One thing that I am liking with this new election format is the email exchanges on the OpenStack mailing list to get a sense for candidates points of view on a variety of things.

In a totally non-work, non-technical context, I have participated and helped organize “candidates nights” events where candidates for election actually get to sit in front of an electorate and answer questions; real politics at the grass roots level. Some years back in one such election, I was elected to a position in the town where I live where I am required to lead with no real authority! So I look forward to doing the same with OpenStack.

You can read my candidacy statement at [1] and [2] so I won’t repeat those things here. I continue to work actively on OpenStack at Verizon now. In the past I was not really a “user” of OpenStack, now I absolutely am, and I am also a contributor. I want to build a better and more functional DBaaS solution and the good news is that there are four companies that are already interested in participating in the project; projects that didn’t participate in the Trove project!

I’m looking forward to working on Hoard in the community, and to serving on the TC if you give me that opportunity!

[1] https://review.openstack.org/#/c/510133/
[2] http://openstack.markmail.org/thread/y22fyka77yq7m3uj

 

Reflections on the (first annual) OpenDev Conference, SFO

Earlier this week, I attended the OpenDev conference in San Francisco, CA.

The conference was focused on the emerging “edge computing” use cases for the cloud. This is an area that is of particular interest, not just from the obvious applicability to my ‘day job’ at Verizon, but also from the fact that it opens up an interesting new set of opportunities for distributed computing applications.

The highlight(s) of the show were two keynotes by M. Satyanarayanan of CMU. Both sessions were video taped and I’m hoping that the videos will be made available soon.

His team is working on some real cool stuff, and he showed off some of their work. The one that I found most fascinating, which most completely illustrates the value of edge computing is the augmented reality application to playing table tennis (which they call ping pong, and I know that annoys a lot of people :))

It was great to hear a user perspective presented by Andrew Mitry of Walmart. With 11,000 stores and an enormous (2mm??) employees, their edge computing use-case truly represents the scale at which these systems will have to operate, and the benefits that they can bring to the enterprise.

The conference sessions were very interesting and some of my key takeaways were that:

  • Edge Computing means different things to different people, because the term ‘Edge’ means different things to different applications. In some cases the edge device may be in a data center, in other cases in your houses, and in other cases on top of a lamp post at the end of your street.
  • A common API in orchestrating applications across the entirety of the cloud is very important, but different technologies may be better suited to each location in the cloud. There was a lot of discussion of the value (or lack thereof) of having OpenStack at the edge, and whether it made sense for edge devices to be orchestrated by OpenStack (or not).
  • I think an enormous amount of time was spent on debating whether or not OpenStack could be made to fit on a system with limited resources and I found this discussion to be rather tiring. After all, OpenStack runs fine on a little raspberry-pi and for a deployment where there will be relatively few OpenStack operations (instance, volume, security group creation, update, deletetion) the limited resources at the edge should be more than sufficient.
  • There are different use-cases for edge-computing and NFV/VNF are not the only ones, and while they may be the early movers into this space, they may be unrepresentative of the larger market opportunity presented by the edge.

There is a lot of activity going on in the edge computing space and many of the things we’re doing at Verizon fall into that category. There were several sessions that showcased some of the things that we have been doing, AT&T had a couple of sessions describing their initiatives in the space as well.

There was a very interesting discussion of the edge computing use-cases and the etherpad for that session can be found here.

Some others who attended the session also posted summaries on their blogs. This one from Chris Dent provides a good summary.

A conclusion/wrap-up session identified some clear follow-up activities. The etherpad for that session can be found here.

How do you answer this interview question, “what do you make in your current job?”

A couple of months ago, a former co-worker called me and asked if I would provide a reference for her in a job search (which I readily agreed to). Then she went on to ask me this, “This company wants to make me an offer and they called and asked me what I currently make, and asked for a copy of a paystub. What should I do?”

Personally, I find this question stupid. I’ve been asked it many times (including quite recently) and in all instances I’ve been surprised by it (doh!) and I’ve answered in what I now consider to be the wrong way.

Every hiring manager has a range of salaries that they are willing to pay for a position, and they have a range of bonuses, a range of stock options and other incentives. And then there’s the common incentives that everyone gets (401(k), vacation, …). So why even ask the question? Why not make an offer that makes sense and be done with it?

If you are a hiring manager / HR person on the hiring side, do you ask this question?

If you are a candidate, how do you handle this question?

In any event, here’s what I recommended to my friend, answer the question along these lines.

  • I’m sure you are asking me this so you can make me a competitive offer that I’ll accept
  • I’m also sure that you have a range for all the components of the offer that you intend to make to me; base pay, bonus, stock options, …
  • So what I’ll tell you is what I am looking for in an offer and I’ll leave it to you to make me an offer based on the standard ranges that you have
  • I am looking for a take-home pay of $ _____ each month
  • Since you offer a 401(k) plan which I intend to contribute $ _____ to, that means I am looking for a total base pay of $ ______ per year.
  • I am looking for a total annual compensation of $ ______ including bonuses
  • In addition, I am looking for ______ days of vacation each year.

That’s it. When asked for a copy of current pay-stub or anything like that, I recommend that you simply decline to provide it and make it clear that this is not any of their business.

Now, whether one can get away with this answer or not depends on how strong your position is for the opening in question. Some companies have a ‘policy’ that they need this paystub/W-2 stuff.

Not providing last pay information and following their ‘process’ could make the crabby HR person label you ‘not a team player’ or some such bogus thing and put your resume in the ‘special inbox’ which is marked ‘Basura’.

In any event, this all was fine and my friend told me  that she was given a good offer which she accepted.

How do you approach this question?