Effective OpenStack contribution: Seven things to avoid at all cost

There are numerous blogs and resources for the new and aspiring OpenStack contributor, providing tips, listing what to do. Here are seven things to avoid if you want to be an effective OpenStack contributor.

I wrote one of these.

There have been presentations at summits that share other useful newbie tips as well, here is one.

Project repositories often include a CONTRIBUTING.rst file that shares information for newcomers. Here is the file for the Trove project.

Finally, many of these resources include a pointer to the OpenStack Developer’s Guide.

Over the past three years, I have seen several newbie mistakes repeated over and over again and in thinking about some recent incidents, I think the community has not done a good job documenting these “Don’t Do’s”.Just don't do it!

So here is a start; here are seven things you shouldn’t do, if you want to be an effective OpenStack contributor.


1. Don’t submit empty commit messages

captureThe commit message is a useful part of the commit and it serves to inform reviewers about what the change is, and how your proposed fix addresses the problem. In general, (with the notable exception of procedural commits for things like releases or infrastructure), the commit message should not be empty. The words “Trivial Fix” do not suffice.

OpenStack documents best practices for commit messages. Make sure your commit message provides a succinct description of the problem, describes how you propose to fix it, and includes a reference (via the Close-Bug, Partial-Bug or Related-Bug tags) to the Launchpad entry for the issue you are fixing.


2. Don’t expect that reviews are automatic

In OpenStack, reviewing changes is a community activity. If you propose changes, they get merged because others in the community contribute their time and effort in reviewing your changes. This wouldn’t work unless everyone participates in the review process.

Just because you submitted some changes, don’t expect others to feel motivated or obligated to review your changes. In many projects, review bandwidth is at a premium and therefore you will have a better chance getting your change reviewed and approved if you reciprocate and review other people’s changes.


3. Don’t leave empty reviews

captureWhen you review someone’s code, merely adding a +1 serves no useful purpose. At the very least indicate what you did with the change. Equally useful is to say what you did not do.

For example, you could indicate that you only reviewed the code and did not actually test it out. Or you could go further and download and test the patch set and indicate in your review comment that you tested the change and found it to work. On occasion, such as when I review a change for the first time, I will indicate that I have reviewed the changes but not the tests.

Feel free to ask questions about the change if you don’t follow what is being done. Also, feel free to suggest alternate implementations if you feel that the proposed implementation is not the best one for some reason(s).

Don’t feel shy about marking changes with a -1 if you feel that it is not ready to merge for some reason.

A drive-by +1 is a generally unhelpful activity, and if you persist at doing that, others in the community will tend to discount your reviews anyway.


4. Don’t game the Stackalytics system

captureBy far, the most egregious violation that I’ve seen is when people blatantly try to game the Stackalytics system. Stackalytics is a tool that tracks individual and company participation in OpenStack.

Here, for example, is the Stackalytics page for the Trove project in the current release:

Reviews: http://stackalytics.com/?module=trove-group

Commits: http://stackalytics.com/?module=trove-group&metric=commits

It allows you to see many metrics in a graphical way, and allows you to slice and dice the data in a number of interesting ways.

New contributors, bubbling with enthusiasm often fall into the trap of trying to game the system and rack up reviews or commits. This can end up very badly for you if you go down this route. For example, recently one very enthusiastic person showed up with a change that got blasted out to about 150 projects, and attempted to add a CONTRIBUTING.rst file to all of these projects. What ensued is documented in this mailing list thread:

A few of the changes were merged before they were reverted, the vast majority were abandoned.

Changes like this serve no real useful purpose. They also consume an inordinate amount of resources in the CI system. I computed that the little shenanigan described above generated approximately 1050 CI jobs and consumed about 190 hours of time on the CI system.

I admit that numbers are important and they are a good indication of participation. But quality is a much more important metric because quality is an indicator of contribution. And I firmly believe that participation is about showing up, contribution is about what you do once you are here, and contribution is a way more important thing to aim for than participation.


5. Don’t ignore review comments

Finally, when you’ve submitted a change, and people review and provide comments, don’t ignore them. If you are serious about a change, you will stay with it till it gets merged. Respond to comments in a timely manner, if only to say that you will come back with a new patch set in some time.

If you don’t, remember that review bandwidth is a scarce resource and in the future your changes may get scant attention from reviewers. Others who review your changes are taking time out of their schedules to participate in the community. At the very least you should recognize and respect that investment on their part and reciprocate with timely responses.


6. Don’t be shy

And above all, if you aren’t sure how to proceed, don’t be shy. Post a question on the mailing list if you aren’t sure what to do about something. If that’s too public for you (and that’s perfectly alright), ask the question on the IRC channel for the project in question. If that is too public, find someone who is active on the project (start with the PTL) and send that person an email.

An important aspect of the role of a PTL is fielding those questions, and all of us (PTL’s) receive several of these questions each month. Not sure whom to ask, then toss the question out on IRC at #openstack or #openstack-dev and you should receive an answer before long.


7. Don’t be an IRC ghost

ghost_single-15An important thing to remember about IRC is that it is an asynchronous medium. So, don’t expect answers in real time. The OpenStack community is highly distributed, but also most active during daylight hours, Monday to Friday in US time. If you pop up on IRC, ask a question and then disappear, you may not get your answer. If you can’t stick around for a long time on IRC, then post your question to the mailing list.

But better still, there are many ways in which you can connect to IRC and leave the connection up (so you can read the scrollback), or find some other mechanism to review the scrollback (like eavesdrop.openstack.org) to see if your question was answered.


If you have your own pet peeve, please share it in the comments section. I hope this will become a useful resource for aspiring OpenStack contributors.

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