IE+Microsoft ROCKS. Ubuntu+Firefox BLOWS

I’m running Ubuntu 9.0.4 and it appears that to upgrade to Firefox 3.5 requires a PhD. Could I borrow yours?

Kevin Purdy has the following “One line install”

That’s not a true install; he just unpacks the tar-ball into the current directory.

Web Upd8 has the following steps

But, now I get daily updates?

What’s with this garbage? Complain as much as you want but Microsoft Software Updates will give you the latest Internet Explorer easily.

Could someone please make this easy?

It’s just numbers people!

I hadn’t read Justin Swanhart’s post (Why is everybody so steamed about a benchmark anyway?) from June 24th till just a short while ago. You can see it at here. Justin is right, it’s just numbers.

He did remind me of a statement from a short while ago by another well known philosopher.

It's a budget

I could not embed the script provided by quotesdaddy.com into this post. I have used their material in the past, they have a great selection of statements that will live on in history. Check them out at http://www.quotesdaddy.com/ 🙂

Head for the hills, here comes more jargon: Anti-Databases and NoSQL

We all know what SQL is, get ready to learn about NoSQL. There was a meet-up last month in San Francisco to discuss it and some details are available at this link. The call for the “inaugural get-together of the burgeoning NoSQL community” drew 150 people and if you are so inclined, you can subscribe to the email list here.

I’m no expert at NoSQL but the major gripe seems to be schema restriction and what Jon Travis calls “twisting your object” data to fit an RDBMS.

NoSQL appears to be a newly coined collective pronoun for a lot of technologies you have heard about before. They include Hadoop, BigTable, HBase, Hypertable, and CouchDB, and maybe some that you have not heard of before like Voldemort, Cassandra, and MongoDb.

But, then there is this thing called NoSQL. The first line on that web page reads

NoSQL is a fast, portable, relational database management system without arbitrary limits, (other than memory and processor speed) that runs under, and interacts with, the UNIX 1 Operating System.

Now, I’m confused. Is this the NoSQL that was referenced in the non-conference at non-san-francisco last non-month?

My Point of View

From what I’ve seen so far, NoSQL seems to be a case of disruption at the “low end”. By “low end”, I refer to circumstances where the data model is simple and in those cases I can see the point that SQL imposes a very severe overhead. The same can be said in the case of a model that is relatively simple but refers to “objects” that don’t relate to a relational model (like a document). But, while this appears to be “low end” disruption right now, there is a real reason to believe that over time, NoSQL will grow into more complex models.

But, the big benefit of SQL is that it is declarative programming language that gave implementations the flexibility of implementing the program flow in a manner that matched the physical representation of the data. Witness the fact that the same basic SQL language has produced a myriad of representations and architectures ranging from shared nothing to shared disk, SMP to MPP, row oriented to column oriented, with cost based and rules based optimizers etc., etc.,

There is (thus far) a concern about the relative complexity of the NoSQL offerings when compared with the currently available SQL offerings. I’m sure that folks are giving this considerable attention and what comes next may be a very interesting piece of technology.



Learning from Joost

A lot of interesting articles have emerged in the wake of the recent happenings at Joost.

One post that caught my attention and deserves reading, and re-reading, and then reading one more time just to be sure is Ed Sim’s post, where he writes

raising too much money can be a curse and not a blessing

A lot to learn from in all of these articles.

Risks of mind controlled vehicles

Some risks of mind controlled vehicles are described.

It is now official, Toyota has announced that they are developing a mind controlled wheel chair. Unless Toyota is planning to take the world by storm by putting large numbers of motorized wheelchairs on the roads, I suspect this technology will soon make its way into their other products, maybe cars?

Of course, this will have some risks

  1. Cars may inherit drivers personality (ouch, there are some people who shouldn’t be allowed to drive)
  2. Cars with hungry drivers will make unpredictable turns into drive through lanes
  3. Car could inadvertently eject annoying back seat drivers
  4. Mortality rates for cheating husbands may go up (see http://www.thebostonchannel.com/news/1965115/detail.html, http://www.click2houston.com/news/1576669/detail.html, http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/840828/posts and a thousand other such posts)
  5. It would be really hard to administer a driving test! Would the ability to think be a requirement for drivers?

Can you think of other risks? I didn’t think I would come to this conclusion but I kind of like the way things are right now where my car has a mind of its own.

What’s next in tech? Boston, June 25th 2009

Recap of “What’s next in Tech”, Boston, June 25th 2009

What’s next in tech: Exploring the Growth Opportunities of 2009 and Beyond, June 25th 2009.

Scott Kirsner moderated two panels during the event; the first with three Veture Capitalists and the second with five entrepreneurs.

The first panel consisted of:

– Michael Greeley, General Partner, Flybridge Capital Partners

– Bijan Sabet, General Partner, Spark Capital

– Neil Sequiera, Managing Director, General Catalyst Partners

The second panel consisted of:

– Mike Dornbrook, COO, Harmonix Music Systems (makers of “Rock Band”)

– Helen Greiner, co-founder of iRobot Corp. and founder of The Droid Works

– Brian Halligan, social media expert and CEO of HubSpot

– Tim Healy, CEO of EnerNOC

– Ellen Rubin, Founder & VP/Product of CloudSwitch

Those who asked questions got a copy of Dan Bricklin’s book, Bricklin on Technology. There was also a DVD of some other book (I don’t know what it was) that was being given away.

Show of hands at the beginning was that 100% of the people were optimistic about the recovery and the future. Nice discussion though after leaving the session, I don’t get the feeling that anyone addressed the question “What’s next in tech” head on. Most of the conversation was about what has happened in tech and a lot of discussion about Twitter and Facebook. There were a lot of questions to the panel from the audience about what their companies were doing to help young entrepreneurs.And for an audience that was supposed to contain people interested in “what’s next”, no one wanted the DVD of the book, everyone wanted the paper copies. Hmm …

There has been a lot of interesting discussion about the topic and the event. One that caught my eye was Larry Cheng’s blog.

How many outstanding Shares in a start-up

Finding the number of outstanding shares in a start-up.

This question has come up quite often, most recently when I was having lunch with some co-workers last week.

While evaluating an offer at a start-up have you wondered whether your 10,000 shares was a significant chunk of money or a drop in the ocean?

Have you ever wondered how many shares are outstanding in a start-up you heard about?

This is a non-issue for a public company, the number of outstanding shares is a matter of public record. But not all start-up’s want to share this information with you.

I can’t say this for every state in the union but in MA, you can get a pretty good idea by looking at the Annual Report that every organization is required to file. It won’t be current information, the best you can do is get the most recent annual information and that means you can’t know anything about a very new company, but it is information that I would have liked to have had on some occasions in the past.

The link to search the Corporate Database is http://corp.sec.state.ma.us/corp/corpsearch/corpsearchinput.asp

Enter the name of the company and scroll to the bottom where you see a box that allows you to choose “Annual Reports”. Click that and you can read a recent Annual Report which will have the information you need.

If you find that this doesn’t work or is incomplete, please post your comments here. I’m sure others will appreciate the information.

And if you have information about other states, that is most welcome.